Digital age and future of nursing

Digital age and future of nursing

The nursing vocation is rapidly transmuting to keep up with advancements and incipient challenges in the healthcare field. As direct caregivers, nurses are in the front lines of patient care and consequently often feel the impact of transmutations in best practices more immediately than other healthcare professionals. Health informatics is withal a consequential part of care coordination in nursing. The facility to track staffing, workflow and communication can avail nurses to identify areas where current processes can be amended. This can withal avail ascertain that staffing levels remain adequate, which is critical for providing patients with the best possible care. There has been paramount investment in ‘Global Digital Exemplar’ Programme with a fixate on the hospital sector and on noetic health accommodations but no direct investment on community settings. Furthermore, 2017 optically discerned the launch of the ‘NHS Digital Academy4’, which will train and support Chief Information officers, senior clinicians, and aspirant digital bellwethers to drive the NHS’ digital transformation. In August 2017 NHS Digital launched e-nursing week, which advocates for a digital workforce and fortifies the Royal College of Nursing’s ‘every nurse an e-nurse’ campaign. This wealth of data supplemental sanctions incipient insights. On an individual Level this sanctions preventative action to be taken and avails make referrals to more specialist accommodations. At a local and national level, information can provide insights about population health, availing to appraise decisions about resource allocation. 44.1% of respondents used laptops to capture information.  Challenges withal arose because software on these contrivances was often inadequate and connectivity could be arduous. Work done on the laptops for the patient’s home often needed to be duplicated later onto the system at the office. In the paper backup the survey identified a perpetuating reliance on paper record keeping. In the some cases paper records were manually transferred onto the IT systems. This duplication of work is time intensive and supplemental increases the possibility for information to be entered inaccurately or incompletely entered. There was a growing opportunity for accessing and sharing the information, both for health professionals and the patients and however, this comes with a range of concerns, centred on data aegis regulations. The competency of health professionals to apportion information requires three key factors to be in place: patient consent, professional governance and compatible systems. 85.1% of respondents identified that poor coverage and Wi-Fi connections were a consequential challenge to working efficaciously in the community. This is concretely the case for rural areas where coverage is arduous - just 59% of properties in rural areas having superfast broadband coverage, 25% unable to achieve download the speeds of above 10Mbits and not only 37% of rural areas covered by 4G14. Respondents felt that the poor connectivity impacted upon the care, due to an inability of access patients’ notes or through appointment changes which are failing to synchronise. A number of respondents verbalized that the prelude of incipient IT systems had resulted in an incremented workload and placed more time pressure onto nurses. Whilst IT had made it more facile for health professional to communicate with one another, this had resulted in an incrementing number of enquiries and injuctively sanctions being directed to staff. A number of respondents felt that the authoritative ordinances of IT systems truncated the amplitude of patient facing time in the working day.

Conferences

Conferences