Wound Healing

Wound Healing

Wound healing is the process that takes place after injury, skin and the tissues under it repair themselves. Healing in the body response to injury in an attempt to retire normal structure and function. The process of healing involves two process regeneration and repair. Regeneration: It is healing takes place by proliferation of parenchymal cells, and usually results in complete restoration of the original tissues. Repair: It is process in which tissues do not return to their normal architecture and function. It typically results in the formation of scar tissue. Healing happens in two, different types of intentions the one with opposite edges, and the other with separated edges. Wound care encourages and speeds wound healing via cleaning and protection from re injury and infection. There are three stages of wound healing inflammation, proliferation, and maturation. A wound may fail to heal if any one healing stages are interrupted. The first phase of wound healing is inflammation, the body’s natural response to trauma. Upon homeostasis is achieved the blood vessels dilate, letting nutrients, white blood cells, enzymes and other beneficial elements into the affected area to promote wound healing and infection. Second phase of wound healing is proliferation the wound begins to rebuild with new and healthy granulation tissue. To get the granulation tissue form, the blood vessels should receive sufficient supply of oxygen and nutrients. The color of the granulation indicates the health of the wound. The body transforms Mesenchymal cells into Fibroblast which serves as bridges that help cells move around the affected area. During proliferation the wound continues to grow stronger as the Fibroblast by developing of new tissue and accelerating the healing process. The third phase of wound healing is maturation also known as remodeling, it is the last stage of wound healing process. During this phase, the dermal tissues are overhauled to enhance the tensile strength and non-functional Fibroblast are replaced by functional ones. It occurs after the wound has closed up and can take as long as years. While the maturation is started it appears that the wound healing process is finished but it’s important to keep the treatment plan. Even after maturation wound areas tend to remain up to 20 percent weaker than they initially were. Wounds heal faster if they are kept warm. Exposing the wound to the open air can drop its temperature and may slow healing for a few hours. The exposed wound should shrink and new skin forming over the skin should be noticed. Using of antiseptic creams, washes or sprays on a chronic wound is dangerous. Wounds and sores that take more time to heal might be infected and require medical treatment, and also indicates the patient is suffering from diabetes. Factors affecting wound healing are infection, ischemia, treatment tension, age, obesity, smoking, Cytotoxic disorders, poor opposition, foreign bodies, ionizing radiation, immunosuppression, site of wound and topical agents, etc. Wound healing as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through highly programmed phases. Understanding the wound healing is as important as knowing the Pathogenesis of disease because satisfactory wound healing is the goal of treatment.

 

Conferences

Conferences