Perioperative Care

Perioperative Care

Perioperative care is the care given before and after surgery. It takes place in hospitals, and in surgical hospital centers attached to hospitals, in freestanding surgical centers, in healthcare provider’s offices. It is the time period of patient during their surgical procedure. The care period commonly includes ward admission, anesthesia, surgery and recovery. The primary concern of perioperative care is to provide better conditions for patients before operation, during and after operation. Describe the nurse legal responsibilities by preparing the patient for surgery. Utilize effective communication techniques in teaching patients and family members about surgery. Perioperative care refers to three phases preoperative, Intraoperative, and postoperative. This period is used to prepares the patient both physically and psychologically for the surgical procedure and after surgery. Preoperative: The phase involves performing tests, preoperative anxiety and preoperative fasting Intraoperative: The Intraoperative period begins after the patient is transferred to the operating room and ends after shifting the patient to the post anesthesia care unit. During this period, the patient is monitored, prepped, anesthetized, draped, and the operation is performed. Nursing activities during this period is focus on safety, infection prevention, opening additional sterile supplies to the field if needed and documenting applicable segments to the Intraoperative report in the patients electronic health record. Postoperative: This face begins after the transfer of patient to post anesthesia care unit and terminates with the resolution of the surgical Sequelae. Perioperative nurses play important role in the whole process they help in planning, implementation, evaluate treatment and nursing care patients receive before, during, and after surgery. The primary studying outcomes were any type of 30-day complication (pneumonia, unplanned intubation, ventilator dependence, cardiac arrest or myocardial infarction, stroke or coma for longer than 24 hours, acute or progressive renal failure, bleeding, sepsis, surgical site infections, wound dehiscence, venous. Perioperative mortality has been defined as any death, regardless of cause, occurring within 30 days after surgery in or out of the hospital. An important consideration in the decision to perform any surgical procedure is to weigh the benefits against the risks. Perioperative management consists of preoperative patient evaluation as well as Intraoperative and postoperative patient monitoring and care. The operative risks are assessed prior to surgery by considering patient history, physically examining the patient, and conducting any tests deemed necessary. Preoperative adjustments are made based on the assessment findings (e.g., stopping, replacing, or temporarily administering certain drugs by another route). The specialist responsible is legally obliged to disclose all relevant information regarding the procedure to the patient. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended in many types of surgery in order to prevent postoperative wound infections. Client assessment varies depending on the urgency of the surgery. Main goals in the postoperative phase are early recovery and preventing complications or, if complications occur, diagnosing and treating them as early as possible.

 

 

 

Conferences

Conferences